For the benefit of both our residents and visitors and in cooperation with others, we strive to faithfully restore, maintain and interpret the physical, historical and cultural legacies of Lahaina, Maui, first capital of the Kingdom of Hawai'i.
 
Historic Sites in Lahaina
Baldwin Home Museum
In 1834 construction began on the Baldwin Home and it was completed in 1835. The thick walls were made from coral block and stone and the frame was made of hand-hewn timber. In 1840, a bedroom and medical study were added and in 1849, an entire second floor was completed. It is the oldest building still standing in Lahaina.
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Wo Hing Museum & Cookhouse
Chinese immigrants were among the first laborers to arrive in the islands. True to their heritage, they maintained social and political ties with their ancestral homes, building social halls or temples where their societies could meet. In 1909, Chinese men living in Lahaina formed the Wo Hing Society, a branch of the Chee Kung Tong, which is a fraternal society with chapters throughout the world. In 1912 using private donations, the society built the attractive two-story temple on Front Street. The wooden cookhouse in the yard served as the society's community kitchen.
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Old Lahaina Courthouse
Constructed between 1858-1859, the Lahaina Court & Customs House first served the whaling trade. Much of the material used to build the original courthouse came from King Kamehameha III's western palace (Hale Piula) that was destroyed during the Kauaula wind of 1858. In 1928, the courthouse was renovated in the Greek Revival architectural style that you see today. Old Lahaina Courthouse was since renovated in 1998 and again in 2013 to include the Lahaina Heritage Museum.
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Hale Aloha
An adobe thatched building which preceded today's structure was referred to as “The School House” and was erected in 1831. Then, members of Waine'e (now Waiola) Church purchased lumber and with their own hands laid a wood floor and made desks and seats for the school, which was eventually destroyed. Later, church members voted to replace the ruins with a new building to be called Hale Aloha (House of Love) in commemoration of Revered Dr. Baldwin’s causing Lahaina to escape the small-pox epidemic that decimated O'ahu in 1853. The new building was completed in 1858.
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Hale Pa'i Museum
One of the earliest Lahaina Restoration Foundation projects was to restore Hale Pa’i (House of Printing) located on the campus of Lahainaluna High School. Missionaries who arrived in Lahaina in 1823 from New England explained to Hawaii's royals the importance of educating their people. Lahainaluna Seminary was established in 1831, becoming the first secondary school West of the Rockies. A Ramage Press arrived within a few years and the printing house was built for the seminary. The students printed Hawaiian language texts, newspapers and Hawaii's currency.
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Hale Pa'ahao/Old Prison
On July 11, 1851, “an Act relating to prisons, their government, and discipline” was passed by the Hawaii Legislature and approved by the King. It authorized a new jail for Lahaina which was to be constructed to “keep entirely separate from each other the male and female prisoners, and to have a yard enclosed by fences of sufficient height and strength to prevent escapes ...” Hale Pa'ahao (Stuck-in-irons House) consisted of the jail with built-in iron shackles, the warden's gatehouse and very thick coral block walls from the Old Fort surrounding the yard.
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Seamen's Hospital
In 1843, King Kamehameha III turned over this building to the U.S. Marines for a hospital to take care of seamen (it was originally built in 1833 by a Chinese merchant). When the whaling industry faded during the Civil War, on Sept. 10, 1862, the doors of the U.S. Seamen’s Hospital were closed. In 1864, the building was leased as a boarding school, then it was traded in 1878 with the Bishop Estate. In 1975, the Seamen’s Hospital became the property of Lahaina Restoration Foundation, which restored it and renovated it for business use.
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Lahaina Lighthouse
The Lahaina Lighthouse stands as a beacon at the edge of Lahaina Harbor. Kamehameha III in 1840 ordered a wooden tower built as a navigational aid for whaling ships. It was built on a section of waterfront known as Keawaiki which means, “the small passage,” referring to a narrow break through coral reef leading to protected anchorage. It was a nine-foot tall, box-like structure with a lamp lit by whale oil. This tower was the first lighted navigational aid in the Pacific.
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Masters Reading Room
In the early 1830s, Lahaina saw the need for ship captains to have a meeting room in which there were publications, newspapers and writing materials for catching up on their logs. The exact location is not certain. In June of 1833, the missionaries resolved to build a reading room (or gentlemen's club) for officers of ships that anchored in Lahaina.
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